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Old 07-11-2013, 09:07 AM
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Default 1999 cr125 cylinder hone

     

i am doing a top end rebuild on my 1999 cr125. I have a stock cylinder and I was woundering what type of metal it is and should I hone the cylinder before I rebuild it. any tips or suggestions would be greatly appreciated
jimi
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Old 07-11-2013, 09:18 AM
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When you do your rebuild measure it to make sure its in spec before going to far. If its good and the plating is good then yes, you'll need to hone it. I have a 3 stone one that has really long stones that I like to use because it doesn't catch on the ports. Lots prefer the ball type hone. Just remember to use some lubrication and don't dry hone it like I've seen some people do.
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Old 07-11-2013, 12:35 PM
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you get a lot of personal preference on hones and honing. like me and Noo. I wont touch a cylinder with ports with a finger hone for instance. I like using one with aluminum oxide stones, and it wont care if you oil it or not. sometimes oil seems to pickup particals and plug the stones, so most people i know wont use oil when honing. water works well and seems to keep the stones clean.

in the kind of honing we do for our plated cylinders, you are not trying to remove metal, only to clean it up and get the glaze off.

FYI I am one of the ones who does not favor lubing the cylinder before assembly either. Tryce Welch has me convinced that rubbing one down with atf and drying it with a clean towel cleans the surface well and doesnt hinder the rings from seating as many of us have found happens when you put it together with with oil.
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Old 07-11-2013, 12:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ossagp View Post
you get a lot of personal preference on hones and honing. like me and Noo. I wont touch a cylinder with ports with a finger hone for instance. I like using one with aluminum oxide stones, and it wont care if you oil it or not. sometimes oil seems to pickup particals and plug the stones, so most people i know wont use oil when honing. water works well and seems to keep the stones clean.

in the kind of honing we do for our plated cylinders, you are not trying to remove metal, only to clean it up and get the glaze off.

FYI I am one of the ones who does not favor lubing the cylinder before assembly either. Tryce Welch has me convinced that rubbing one down with atf and drying it with a clean towel cleans the surface well and doesnt hinder the rings from seating as many of us have found happens when you put it together with with oil.
thanks for the info andy, do you think I would be ok if I just cleaned it real good and if I orded a prox piston kit will the ring gap specs already be set for a 1999 cr125
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Old 07-11-2013, 12:57 PM
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on the gaps, they seem to differ a little between manfacturers, but i run them down as tight as 12 for a bore that is smaller than 60mm and never have had a problem. .014" is probably more common, and easy to check when you install. i know several people who have used the proX including me (cr500) with acceptable results. oe or wiseco is more common though. you can clean it with a scotch bright pad if you want to. look for aluminum deposits and deal with those first and clean up the parts the rings will run on. lube the bearings good.
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ossagp View Post
on the gaps, they seem to differ a little between manfacturers, but i run them down as tight as 12 for a bore that is smaller than 60mm and never have had a problem. .014" is probably more common, and easy to check when you install. i know several people who have used the proX including me (cr500) with acceptable results. oe or wiseco is more common though. you can clean it with a scotch bright pad if you want to. look for aluminum deposits and deal with those first and clean up the parts the rings will run on. lube the bearings good.
ok thanks for the info very much appriciated
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:09 PM
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i stick a file in a vice and squeeze the ring ends together and go up and down and measure afer the first up and down to see where i am everytime.

if you put the ring in the bottom of the cylinder, square it up with the piston and check the gap,,,then push it along the lenth of the area it rides in, you can get a really good idea of of the wear. just remember your geometry when figuring out what .002" is on the circumference as opposed to the diameter of the bore.
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