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  #1  
Old 10-20-2010, 01:14 AM
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Pics '03 CR125 Rebuild - NewAtThis

     

Hey all,
I've got a 03 Cr125 that I've had for about 5 years, but never done any real maintenance besides keeping it running. It's in a pretty neglected state, I've barely ridden it in years, and I want to get it back to better than ever. I'm a complete newbie, never done anything mechanical like this, but I'm fairly handy and up for the experience.

Plan : I'm going to rebuild the top end, reseal the forks, replace the reed valve, exhaust system, brake lines/pads, sprockets/chain, figure out jetting. There's many rusty bolts I'd like to replace. Already dealing with 1 helplessly stripped bolt holding the exhaust port to the cylinder.

I just got the service manual in the mail and took the bike half apart to see what I'm getting myself into. I'm going to do a large Parts Order from MotoSport.com any day now.

Looking forward to building a fast bike, and my ears are open to any input. I'm sure I'll have some questions, and I appreciate your time.


Starting Line:








Here we go,
Dillon
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Old 10-20-2010, 10:43 AM
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Doesn't look like the bike is in too bad shape, should be a challenging
but doable rebuild.

Soak all those rusty bolts with penetrating lube for a few days before
putting a wrench on them. For that exhaust flange bolt, try one of those
grip-tote sockets, they are made for situations like that.

You will probably find more parts you will need to add to your order as you
disassemble the bike. Also, please remove the chain and CS sprocket before
you take anymore pictures, it hurts to look at that kind of neglect.

Good luck with it.

dogger
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Old 10-20-2010, 11:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dogger315 View Post
Also, please remove the chain and CS sprocket before you take anymore pictures, it hurts to look at that kind of neglect.
I was wondering why my eyes keep tearing up looking at the post.
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Old 10-20-2010, 03:58 PM
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Okay the chain and sprockets are gone Looks like grip-tite sockets aren't made in less than 10mm, I need an 8mm. I'm not sure how I'm going to get the bolt out, it's not pretty. I'd prefer to avoid taking it to a shop, but I will if I have to.

I don't want to really want to disassemble the rear shock, but I want to service it and change the fluid. The service manual isn't very clear here, but should I take the shock off the bike, replace fluid and nitrogen?
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Old 10-21-2010, 05:30 PM
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Another method I've used for stuck bolts is after you have soaked the joint
with penetrating oil for 24 hrs., is to heat the area with a torch or oven to
250-300 degrees. Then use a vice grip to clamp onto the bolt head and
break it loose. The last resort would be to grind or cut the bolt head off,
remove the flange, then slot the bolt and remove it with a screwdriver or
use the vice grips again on the exposed portion of the bolt.

I'm sure the shock can benefit from a rebuild, but be aware, you will need
special tools and Nitrogen. I recommend you send that job out.

dogger
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Old 10-21-2010, 06:58 PM
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if your going to rebuild it THEN maintain it correctly, plan on using some professional help from time to time. I would recommend to take the stripped bolt to a reputable shop if your a less experienced person- no sense in doing more damage if you can help it. To save some money, re use your old pipe untill after your build. just clean it up and paint it- you may need some more unexpected parts and that pipe money wil come in handy. I would also recommend to replace all rear swingarm and rear shock bearings. good luck, update with some pics...fun project!
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Old 10-22-2010, 11:44 AM
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Thanks for all the advice !,I got the stripped bolt out with a craftsman bolt out kit. It wasn't cheap, but it worked very well, highly recommended.



I'll be taking my forks off and apart as soon as i get the cap wrench. I'm polishing my big order. I'm still undecided about the rear shock I guess I should take it off the bike and take it to someone? approximately how much would that be??$. I think the linkage is okay, I just need to replace some rusted bolts and grease it up.





---------- Post added at 12:44 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:38 PM ----------

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Old 10-22-2010, 04:53 PM
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That poor bike was it left outside to die take the rear shock to a pro there is alot of parts in the rear shock plus you still have to have it recharged
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Old 10-23-2010, 09:28 AM
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Quote:
I got the stripped bolt out with a craftsman bolt out kit
Congrats on that. I'll have to take a look at that kit. Looks like you are
making good progress.

There are quite a few competent suspension shops to send your shock to.
I like Pro Circuit, but have used Factory Connections with good results in
the past. I'm also certain your linkage bearings are going to be shot judging
from the pictures. Bearing kits are available from Pivot Works and others.
You will need a press to remove the old sleeves, so that may be another
job you farm out.

As you can see, restoring/rebuilding a bike is a never ending series of
surprises as your "laundry list" of needed new parts keeps growing.

dogger
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Old 10-23-2010, 10:39 AM
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Dogger, you are the man I need to meet!! In 40 years I have never been able to grind off a bolt head, put a slot in the bolt shaft and get the darned thing to come out WHEN your original suggestion failed (vise grips). Heat is my friend as well when doing these projects.

I have resorted to just about everything under the sun. The so called easy outs are a total misnomer as far as I an concerned. For those who like to redo the older than 2 year old projects where spray washing is the order of the breed, a drill press and some of those short fine ridged easyouts that Mac and Snapon sell are a must. get your small visegrips from someone who sells real quality too. It pays in that situation. They tend to work best when fresh of course, so put them in the back of the tool box just for such occasions.

If I were trying to get that bolt off, I would take a hammer and do some serious tapping so that the head of the bolt is somewhat mushroomed out. Find an appropriate sized socket (impact sockets work well) and drive it on. Now see if after heating the heck out of it with a propane or mappgas torch you can get it out.
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Old 10-24-2010, 10:41 AM
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Quote:
I have never been able to grind off a bolt head, put a slot in the bolt shaft and get the darned thing to come out
Doesn't work sometimes for me either. I have used it with success on stator
plate mounting screws and just recently to remove one of the exhaust flange
bolts (the previous owner rounded), on the 500 I'm building. I cut the head
off with a cut-off wheel and removed the flange. I cross-slotted the bolt
with a dremel then soaked the joint with penetrating lube. The next day I
put the cylinder in the oven and warmed it to 350 degrees. Removed the
cylinder and used a Phillips T-handle to remove the bolt without any drama.
If the slot had failed, I would have defaulted to a pair of Matco mini vice
grips. With the exhaust flange, I'm fairly sure the heat is what made it work.

This is why I emphasize to everyone, why not make your life easier and prep
every bolt. But from what I 've seen over the years, I'm just p*ssing in the
wind.

dogger
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Old 10-24-2010, 02:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dogger315 View Post
This is why I emphasize to everyone, why not make your life easier and prep
every bolt. But from what I 've seen over the years, I'm just p*ssing in the
wind.

dogger

How do you prep yours?
I w/wheel mine and sometimes put some threadlock on them...
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Old 10-24-2010, 08:02 PM
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threadlock? I was going to suggest some never seize, and frequent removal.

Now I want to see that craftsman kit mentioned.

Dogger, I hear you on using every thing in the arsenal.

One of my favorites is to get a nut and weld onto the round head. easily done with a wirefeed. I find surprisingly few have that every so handy welder though.
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Old 10-25-2010, 11:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunter77ah View Post
How do you prep yours?
I w/wheel mine and sometimes put some threadlock on them...
Threadlock is good. Every bolt should be prepped with thread lock, ant-
seize, dielectric grease, ti-prep, oil, grease, etc.

There are so many dissimilar metals on your bike that galling, seizing
and galvanization are constant potential problems. Combine that with
the neglect from many owners and the results are predictable.

Ossa, unfortunately I'm one of those without a MIG. I'm down to a TIG
and a torch (for brazing). That is an excellent tip though and a technique
I will be adding to my arsenal. That's what I love about this site, I learn
something very cool on a regular basis.

dogger
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Old 11-02-2010, 07:36 PM
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I would fix all the rusted bolts and get new chain and sprockets also hows the bike run?
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Old 11-03-2010, 09:28 AM
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I would also Fix Get new tires your tread looks awfully worn. Also i would change all the fluids:
Tranny
Brake
Fork
just to be on the safe side of things.
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