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  #1  
Old 09-12-2010, 06:14 PM
dogger315's Avatar
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Default CR500 Engine Build Pictorial Part 2

     

Now that the engine has been completely disassembled, It's time to
clean everything up and determine which parts are good and which
ones aren't. All the parts were cleaned in a hot solvent tank then
dried with compressed air.

Each part was inspected. Wear parts were checked for tolerance
with a micrometer, castings were NDIed for cracks or casting flaws.
Any part that failed was repaired (if possible), or discarded.

Anytime you are rebuilding an engine, I highly recommend that all
the bearings, seals, collars, thrust washers and circlips are replaced.
I also replace the shift pawls and all internal springs.

For race prep, the crankshaft and piston assembly were sent to
Crankworks for balancing and the HGA close ratio transmission I had
previously picked up and all the other engine internals were sent to
PCRM for REM Isotropic finishing. The Isotropic finish greatly reduces
friction. This in turn, improves shifting action, lessens gear wear and
allows the engine to run cooler.

I removed the bearings from the cases by placing them in an oven pre
heated to 300 degrees for 30 minutes. I removed each case and "slapped"
them against a pair of 2X4s on the ground which caused all the bearings to
drop out.

Right case after bearings removed and before final cleaning

Left case same as above

Once the bearings were removed, the cases were placed in an ultrasonic
parts washer with a special Aluminum cleaner at 165 degrees for 30
minutes.

The clean cases were heated to 250 degrees in an oven and the new
bearings were cooled to 0 degrees in a freezer. The cold bearings were
dropped in the hot cases and the bearing retainer installed (Red arrow).


With all the background and farmed out work completed, it's time to assemble the engine.

Install the rubber baffle.

Install the crankshaft in the right side case using a crankshaft installation
tool.

Then install the previously assembled transmission clusters


after lubricating with clean gear oil (Honda HP Pro) into the right side case.
The clusters have to be installed meshed together.

Next up are the shift forks. Forks stamped "R" and "L" on the right
side of the shift drum with "R" on the bottom and the fork stamped
"C" on the left. Douse everything in gear oil before installing

Now install the shift drum after coating it with gear oil. Insert the shift
fork pins into the shift drum grooves.

Finally, coat the shift fork shafts with gear oil and install.

Now turn your attention to the left side case half and install the bearing
retainer as shown using threadlock on the screws and torquing to 7 lb.ft.

install the crankcase ventilation hose.

Back to the right side case, lubricate the two dowels with oil and install
along with a new gasket.

Place the left side case on the right and install using the crankshaft
installation tool as shown to pull the case together while keeping a
constant gap.

Remove the crankshaft installation tool, install the 10 bolts (Red arrows),
and tighten to 7 lb.ft. Pack the seal lips with grease and install (Blue
arrows). Grease a new O ring and place it in the collar (Yellow arrow)
and install. Don't forget the seal over the clutch actuating rod bore
inside the ignition cavity (not marked). Finally, trim the excess gasket
material above the cylinder deck.

Grease the lips and install a new seal (Blue arrow), and collar (Yellow
arrow), on the right side.


That wraps up this segment. Next up are all the components in the right
side case cover and the ignition.

Last edited by dogger315; 09-17-2010 at 08:36 AM.
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  #2  
Old 09-13-2010, 01:26 AM
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Dogger your work and effort in these threads is amazing and appreciated.

Question: I see the crankcase ventilation tube in the pic, the other day I was riding and had about six or seven drops of oil drip out as well as antifreeze slowly coming from the radiator overflow tube. Is this a water pump problem or what?
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Old 09-13-2010, 02:00 AM
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Nice work. Seriously your attention to detail and your efforts in documenting this are very appreciated. So thank you for all your efforts. I know it is not easy.
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Old 09-13-2010, 08:58 AM
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Quote:
Is this a water pump problem or what?
No, those vents were just doing there job. Sounds like
you were riding hard and got the temps up. The place
you don't want to see oil dripping is from a tiny hole
located on the bottom of the case at the centerline
just aft of the exhaust outlet. Oil from that location
indicates a bad center case seal.
Quote:
thank you for all your efforts. I know it is not easy.
My pleasure. Glad to do it and glad to help others over-
come the "mysteries" of engine building.

dogger
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Old 09-14-2010, 12:34 AM
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........

A great job. My thanks to their contributions.
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Old 03-21-2012, 10:10 PM
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Default Ultrasonic...

Got a chance to look at some of your builds... Beautiful work. Absolutely beautiful. I'm looking to invest in an Ultrasonic and I saw the picture of your Crest. I was wondering what model you use that fits case halves?

Matt
mx_rooster (ATM)
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Old 03-24-2012, 01:32 PM
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Thanks, Matt.

The one in the picture is a 7.75 gallon model if I remember correctly.
It is big enough for cases, cylinders, etc. You can get them on EBay
for a decent price. If you go with an ultrasonic, you'll also need some
material specific chemicals. I've been using Bransons with real good
results.

dogger
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Old 04-02-2012, 10:15 AM
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Dogger, thanks for all the excellent posts. Referred to many times during a CR500 rebuild over the last month.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:07 PM
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Default Drive shaft bearing screws

How do you get these to break free, mine are completely frozen and will not come loss.
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Old 08-22-2012, 06:53 PM
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Dude...did you work for Factory Honda back in the day?? I love these threads man, your work is so mint it hurts my brain! Keep it up!!
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Old 08-23-2012, 09:17 AM
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I'm not sure which bolts you're talking about belandbroc. Regardless,
the best way is to soak them with penetrating oil for 24 hours, clean
off the oil with a fast drying solvent like brake cleaner. Let that dry,
then heat the area with a low heat propane torch. This will cause the
Aluminum to expand at a faster rate that the Steel bolt, breaking it
loose so you can remove it.

No ex factory Honda here Frodad, just another enthusiast like everyone
else. Glad you like the post, I need to PM you about what I found.

dogger
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Old 08-23-2012, 12:28 PM
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Sounds good Dogger, My new Renthals should be arriving today!
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Old 01-30-2013, 11:25 PM
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Howzit Dogger

Sorry to bring this up what appears to be years after your post. Your Ultrasonic cleaner is a 7.75 US Gal so essentially a 30 ltr. Out of curiosity for all engine parts 500 and 250 alike do you think one would get away with a smaller system? I only ask as a 5 US Gal Crest on ebay is around 700 which is a bit pricey. What would you suggest would be the ideal dimensions for a washer which would cater for the anal enthusiast? Ideally L x B x H dimensions would be ideal. Clearly the cylinder and cases each bring their own volume constraints which need to be catered for. Your help is greatly appreciated as I'm just trying to get my ducks in a line before I embark on my first 500 and 250 conversions side by side. Cheers Rob
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Old 01-31-2013, 07:07 PM
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My Crest measures about 20"X13"X8" deep. This is the smallest
size that will still fit a crankcase half or a 500 cylinder. The model
I have can be purchased for around $1500 USD.

Do you know the interior dimensions of the 5 gal unit you're looking
at? The reason I ask is you may be able to get buy with a smaller
size if you are willing to only clean half of the part at a time.

I know these washers are costly, but they're worth it for the job
they do and the time they save. The real bonus is when you combine
the correct cleaning chemistry and temperature. I have managed to
return corroded case halves and carburetors to nearly pristine state
after a 30 minute wash.

Here's a before and after picture of a Keihin carburetor off of a 1974
CR125:





dogger
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Old 02-01-2013, 01:18 PM
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19.3" x 11" x 7.7" its essentially a 27 Ltr so aprox 7.1 US Gal. I've found one in the UK but still looking at 650 or $1020. I fully can see the benefit and even if I had the time I believe it would be difficult to achieve the results at all which you have managed to achieved in just 30 min. I guess pointless looking for a secondhand cleaner as most people who have one would probably keep it for life. I'm just going to have to just get one its versatility, longevity and ease of use outweigh the cost.
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Old 02-01-2013, 11:24 PM
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cool post
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