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  #11  
Old 05-15-2012, 07:48 AM
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full on brakes or full on throttle is what every racer would like to be able to do lap after lap. to steal someone else's "dream number" 99.99% of them don't reach that.

what size two stroke are you riding, del'?
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  #12  
Old 05-15-2012, 08:55 AM
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Originally Posted by robfromga View Post
Scott, you never slip the clutch in a tight corner? Never? Wow. You never slip in a tight woods section? Wow.
Rarely. Not to say never but it's rare. Perhaps my flock shoot statement was a bit misleading. My point is that I see a lot of people cook a clutch because they think it's an acceptable alternative to shifting or proper gear selection or throttle control. I guess everyone has their own riding style. Hey - it's your bike - do as you wish.

I don't ride woods.

Scott
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Old 05-15-2012, 08:57 AM
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I do agree that you shouldn't use the clutch to compensate for the wrong gear but I nip it whenever I need a well timed burst of power. It's like a trigger when used correctly. The only time that I don't use it is for downshifting. The reason is that you are not putting a major load on the engine when downshifting and should be braking at that point. I also run my idle very low so that I can downshift right before a corner while also hitting the brakes and the engine will help to slow me down.
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Old 05-15-2012, 03:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Randog Leader View Post
I do agree that you shouldn't use the clutch to compensate for the wrong gear but I nip it whenever I need a well timed burst of power. It's like a trigger when used correctly. The only time that I don't use it is for downshifting. The reason is that you are not putting a major load on the engine when downshifting and should be braking at that point. I also run my idle very low so that I can downshift right before a corner while also hitting the brakes and the engine will help to slow me down.
I agree completely. Feathering or slipping the clutch is just a normal part of every day 2 stroke riding (when it comes to being fast) because coming out of a turn in 3rd gear (slightly bogged) it is infinitely faster to slip the clutch and be right in the power of 3rd, ready to hit the jump or whatever the obstacle may be VS. downshifting to 2nd...going through the quick powerband, then up to 3rd. Basically you would need a lot more room (distance) to do this and it's just simply not as fast.

It took me a while to finally figure out there is a difference in what's "best" for your bike (since I'm all big on that) and what makes you faster. Sometimes they collide, so you've got to pick your style. I'm always doing what's best for the bike, warm ups, rebuild, maintenance but when I've done all that work and feeling it and trying to rip, the old clutch...the shall slip! In fact I love the clutch work of 2 strokes so much, I just installed a hydro clutch from Magura...Only problem is bike won't be running until my new carb comes in friday (hopefully) along with those ginormous 1-3/8" easton exp bars. It should feel like a totally different bike. Until then I just walk out and pull on the clutch, and man is it nice!
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Old 05-15-2012, 03:09 PM
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Originally Posted by MXtras View Post
Rarely. Not to say never but it's rare. Perhaps my flock shoot statement was a bit misleading. My point is that I see a lot of people cook a clutch because they think it's an acceptable alternative to shifting or proper gear selection or throttle control. I guess everyone has their own riding style. Hey - it's your bike - do as you wish.

I don't ride woods.

Scott
Slipping the clutch to add some rpm in a corner exit or at the base of a jump won't cook a clutch. Your the only guy on the track not clutching somewhere.
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  #16  
Old 05-15-2012, 04:29 PM
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Like ossagp eluded to, the size of the two stroke motor will have a great effect on the amount of clutch slipping needed. A 200 lb rider on a 80 cc bike is going to need to fan that little puppy like a hurricane. A 150 lb rider on a 500.... ehhmmmm not so much. Matter of fact, probably not too picky about what gear you're in as well.....

Last edited by VAL; 05-15-2012 at 04:39 PM.
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  #17  
Old 05-15-2012, 04:51 PM
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You'll enjoy that Magura clutch late in a long moto...always smooth like butter.

And I couldn't agree more Val. When I get to race the rm500, clutch only on the start. Now on the 78 yz100....poor clutch, it gets a workout.

You'll find what works best for you.
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Old 05-15-2012, 06:06 PM
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Originally Posted by char393 View Post
You'll enjoy that Magura clutch late in a long moto...always smooth like butter.
Oh yea, I'm already in love and I haven't even got to ride with the darn thing yet. I have only installed it and it's funny, every time I go downstairs I'll instinctively walk out there and start pulling on it while I think about it why the hell I came downstairs in the first place?? Then I remember it's just to do that

Some people actually say there is no difference between it and the stock cable clutch. I don't know if they're smoking crack, J, or both, but this thing is the bees knees. Before it was a pain to pull with just 2 fingers, and I would catch myself using all 4 fingers (no grip on bars) which is the reason for the switch. Now it's about as much effort as 4 fingers, with only using 1 finger Not to mention no more adjusting, cable cleaning, lubing, and hand cramps. This combined with the new bars should be a night/day difference on vibes and overall hand/arm fatigue.
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  #19  
Old 07-30-2012, 07:34 PM
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I recently purchased a 2004 suzuki rm125, this is my first bike, and have put about five or six hours riding on it. having a blast with it, trying to get the whole power band thing down but I have only been shifting using the clutch? upshifting/downshifting, because I assumed not using the clutch causes more wear on the transmission like in a car. I am new to bikes and new to two strokes, having loads of fun ripping this thing but dont want to cause unnessescary harm to the bike is this wrong to use the clutch all the time? And what do you guys mean by "slipping the clutch"
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  #20  
Old 07-31-2012, 10:06 AM
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"Slipping" or "Fanning" the clutch is commonly used when the gear is just a tad too tall but downshifting would make it rev out without any speed gains. By pulling the clutch in just a tad, the revs will build up very quickly (almost instantly) and the once "too tall" gear is now in the meat of the power band.

You also need to learn how to time the clutch with the throttle. When the clutch is used with the throttle, you can turn it into a sort of "trigger" and get the power that you need instantly. It is more of an advanced technique but way more effective than just twisting the throttle and hoping that it will hit at the right time.

Enjoy your clutch and don't worry so much about wearing it out. That's why they get replaced. It's almost like saying, "I don't want to wear out my piston". Really? Then don't start the bike!

---------- Post added at 11:06 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:03 AM ----------

A great example and practice technique is to find a small, kicker-style jump that is maybe a couple feet tall. Casually ride over to the jump at a walking pace, then right as you are about to go off the jump, pull the clutch in slightly while revving the throttle and then let the clutch out at the exact time that you want to take off the jump. It's all about coordinating the two at the right time but the effect is a sudden controlled burst of power right when you want it.
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