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  #81  
Old 06-26-2012, 11:30 PM
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Me too!
LOL.....
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  #82  
Old 07-06-2012, 11:07 PM
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I may not get much garage work done this weekend so I'll answer a couple questions a few folks have asked about the drive-line on these odd birds

This is the old and new U-joints. The driveshaft that goes through the frame backbone connects to this at the steering pivot point. My old one was pretty much shot, with about 20 degrees of static play. The new one, which I just ordered over the phone from Rokon a couple days ago, looks pretty spiffy. Sealed needle bearings have to be quite an improvement over the ball and pin system from 1963.

This is the old and new version of the over-ride clutch, or differential as they are sometimes called. You can see the former owner didn't care much for proper maintenance. At some point he just welded the two halves together. Does anyone still call that a "Lincoln Locker" in a car?
I bet it didn't turn too well.
You can kind of see how it is supposed to work in looking at the new one. That cylinder is actually two cylinders, split in the middle that connects the driveline together. Then the big flat-wound spring goes around both parts. When the engine puts power to the rear wheels, the spring tightens around the clutch halves and drives the front wheel. If the front wheel needs to turn faster than the rear, (in a turn), that loosens the spring to let that happen. Also, when the front brake is applied, the spring tightens around the cylinders connecting the front and rear wheels to braking force. Kind'a neat actually. It works like a big metal Chinese finger trap- more force = tighter grip. The new one is improved over the original in a couple ways.Dave Fillman, His Page makes some high quality upgrade parts for these things and he has been a great help. If you look close, you can see that the new one uses double pins and a key-way to attach to the driveshaft. The old one just has a single pin at both ends. I was a bit surprised when I went to his web site and found out he made replacement axles for my model, (I have a very early model that needs part of the axle turned down to exactly fit the Ducati front brake)

Last edited by Tracker; 07-07-2012 at 12:41 AM.
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  #83  
Old 07-06-2012, 11:48 PM
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Does anyone still call that a "Lincoln Locker" in a car?
Oh boy......do you know how long it's been since I heard that term?



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Originally Posted by Tracker View Post
I was a bit surprised when I went to his web site and found out he made replacement axles for my model, (I have a very early model that needs part of the axel turned down to exactly fit the Ducati front brake)
Marty....If you can get me the axel & the dimensions, I can get it turned down at the shop.
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  #84  
Old 07-07-2012, 12:39 AM
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Marty....If you can get me the axel & the dimensions, I can get it turned down at the shop.
Thanks for the offer but I didn't word that right. My surprise was that this shop sells a replacement axle that is turned down to work on those early Trailbreakers that have the Ducati front brake.
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  #85  
Old 09-03-2012, 10:02 PM
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Default Brakes


A wise man once said, "What goes up, must come down". I figure since this thing will supposedly climb something a person can barely walk up; and I have a tendency to do things on a bike before I think them through, I may find myself needing to safely go down a hill of substantial angle. Originally, my TrailBreaker only had one brake and it was on the front wheel. I'm sure it worked just fine, as long as the over-ride clutch was working properly. If that part was to fail the bike could only apply braking force to the front wheel. Luckily, an upgrade (longer) shaft is available for the rear drive unit which allows enough room to put a disc brake on the rear drive. I've planned on adding that feature since I found out the part was available.
Hard to tell from this angle but the rider doing the stoppie is Joel Robert.

The caliper is from the Karting world. It's mechanical but I mounted it "floating" and put a slightly longer actuating arm on. I have fairly long levers from a Triumph street bike so I'm hoping to have decent braking. Rokon went to two juice brakes several years ago and I'm sure they are better. Kinda' pricey though so I went with mechanical.

This caliper was a tad bigger than stock so it sticks out on the left side. I MM'd a guard from 5/16ths round to reduce the chances of a big impact force getting transferred to the disc and the rear miter box. It should deflect most flesh away from levers and spinning parts too.
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  #86  
Old 09-23-2012, 10:41 PM
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Default Bye Bye Ole' Yeller



I finally got to a point where it was time to get the last of the Nethercutt Chrome Yellow paint off the frame and start wrapping this thing up. Of course, every time I think it's time to paint and assemble, I think of just one more thing that need to be figured out or made. This oversight happened to be the seat; then exhaust mounting; then air filter plumbing routing; then some kind of hand shifter linkage; then cable routing and wiring harness mounting....... There was no way I could just refer to my plans or my CAD program to work these last few things out so it was time for a full mock-up and a lot of cardboard cutting.


It was fun to bolt stuff together and get a glimpse of what it is going to look like. After a few more details it will be time to paint the frame and do some real assembly.
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  #87  
Old 09-24-2012, 11:26 PM
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These things look totally awesome Tracker- keep us updated!
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  #88  
Old 09-25-2012, 12:06 AM
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Keep truckin Tracker and it's impressive...
It's looking good but I'm concerned about you blinding the deer with the lights.
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  #89  
Old 09-25-2012, 12:37 AM
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It's looking good but I'm concerned about you blinding the deer with the lights.
I've heard about that somewhere......

The square light on top is a 60W driving light. I wouldn't turn it on without the engine running so I'll wire it that way. The stock ATC lighting was about the same wattage so I shouldn't have any stator problems. The two round lights under the rack are LED accessory lights. In the store display you could test them by pushing a button on the package. I was impressed by the light they put out on two wristwatch batteries. I'll make those able to turn on engine running or not.
I believe in lights. Where I go it gets dark on a regular basis.

Last edited by Tracker; 09-25-2012 at 12:59 PM.
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  #90  
Old 09-25-2012, 09:51 AM
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Quote:
Where I go it gets dark on a regular basis.
No. Really?
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  #91  
Old 09-25-2012, 12:58 PM
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No. Really?

Even more amazing is the number of riders who don't seem to know that or who think... well, I don't know what they think.
I do know how popular I get when I'm coming in late and I come across guys without lights.
Kind of like a motorized version of The Pied Piper.
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  #92  
Old 09-25-2012, 02:22 PM
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That little 125 Honda looks great in that bike. How are you going to shift, hand or foot?
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  #93  
Old 09-25-2012, 08:45 PM
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Nice build it's always a good feeling to take something that was rotting in someone's shed or back yard and return it to it's former glory
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  #94  
Old 09-25-2012, 11:24 PM
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That little 125 Honda looks great in that bike. How are you going to shift, hand or foot?
Hand shift, for sure. That's one of the things I had to assemble the main parts for. I use the "progressive engineering" system; I engineer as I progress.
Then, I sometimes have to re-engineer as I progress farther.
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  #95  
Old 09-27-2012, 11:33 AM
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A long time ago I rode a Vespa in Tahiti. The left hand grip rotated with a three position rotation with detent. You would pull in the clutch lever and rotate forward to shift through the three gears. You don't have a clutch lever to worry about but the idea of a cable running down to a modified shift lever assembly might be the ticket, rather than maybe an extended shift lever that you would have to take your hands off the bars to operate.


Last edited by VAL; 09-28-2012 at 08:32 AM.
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  #96  
Old 09-28-2012, 11:23 AM
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You got my creative juices flowing yesterday when I read this. I went out into the garage and stared at things for a while, drew some pictures, and pondered different possibilities.
I really like your idea of shifting without taking hands off the bars. I guess it didn't occur to me because every Rokon / Trailbreaker ever made is shifted by hand (If it shifts at all). All the different methods of shifting present some kind of complication. Right now I'm leaning toward K.I.S.S. and looking to upgrade down the road.
The area around the shift shaft is already overcrowded by Honda's addition of a rope starter on this model. I've never been inside one of these horizontal cylinder engines, but if it is possible, I'd like to take the rope starter off and put a kickstarter on. The right-side case does have a plugged hole where one might go. The question is, would it be possible to add the internal parts necessary to have a kicker. Taking the rope off would make a lot of room where I might put a cable or electric solenoid shifting system.
For now, I'd still like to have this thing running before the hunting seasons are over so I'll probably go low-tech and have a simple mechanical hand shifter.
Thanx for the idea and motivation Val.
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  #97  
Old 09-28-2012, 11:29 AM
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The hand shifter is easy to put on. I did one for a guy who had a cl90 back when it was current. Is it the recoil starter assy itself that is in the way, or the way you have to access the pull rope?

the same engine was used in two wheelers too, so I don't think it will be hard to find a donor for the kickstarter. have you got kicking clearance?
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  #98  
Old 09-28-2012, 03:23 PM
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Is it the recoil starter assy itself that is in the way, or the way you have to access the pull rope?
The recoil assembly adds almost two inches to the engine width and it hides the shift shaft. This engine has the Hi/Lo tranny option mounted just to the rear of the clutch and recoil so I can't sneak anything in from behind.
I'm picturing my hand shifter looking like an upside down question mark with the curl going around the front of the clutch area.
Quote:
the same engine was used in two wheelers too, so I don't think it will be hard to find a donor for the kickstarter. have you got kicking clearance?
In just looking from the outside it looks like the 110 two wheeler engine is identical to this 125 - with the exception of my rope starter, electric start, and Hi/Lo tranny. (add-ons) I'd like to think that my 125 is going to be just like a kick-start 110 on the inside. I have plenty of kicking room where needed and used little Honda parts are plentiful out my way. It may be time to hit the books as I can't get an expert that will look me in the eye and tell me a definite yes or no.
I added a kick-starter to a '98 Suzuki DR 350 (in '98) that came electric only and the parts were $450 from a dealer.
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Old 09-28-2012, 04:22 PM
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i havent looked really close, but I want to say everything from the step thru 90 with the over head cam was the same. that should open up such things as S90's as well as possible donors.
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  #100  
Old 10-07-2012, 10:42 PM
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Default A place to sit

One of the things I needed to do the mock-up for was the seat. I have the luxury of not having to make the bike fit anybody but me and I want it to be a good fit. The bike has no suspension so I have been considering making a sprung seat. I thought since Rokon did it a few years ago, it might be a good idea. Then reality sunk in as I gazed at things. Several significant mods had eaten up all the space where a small shock or two might have gone. Plus, I want to get this thing on the trail and at this point, simple is pretty appealing. Of course, nothing with this project has been real simple.

Most Trailbreakers mount the rear of their seat on a frame crossmember. But, since my original one had to be cut off I made a new removable one. The long cross piece is left-over 7/8ths OD frame tubing with an inch or so 3/4 round stock beat into each end.


After cutting a bunch of cardboard prototypes I settled on a shape and cut it out of an old speed limit sign I found in a desert trash pile. 1/8th aluminum isn't going to hold my weight without flexing so I riveted 3/4 x 3/4 x 1/8 aluminum angle around the perimeter and across the braces in the middle. It was a PITA to do but it's darn strong and pretty light.

For bottom brackets I used the rear one from the ATC donor trike and I made the front one. The holes drilled in it aren't to save the ounce of weight, they are to make it look less like the BBQ grill plate it was made from.

Ready for foam.
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