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  #41  
Old 05-06-2012, 09:12 PM
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Default SHOP SAFETY

     


ossagp must have jinx'd me when he mentioned shop fires. I've now had three.
Nothing serious. Just stray sparks getting into my box of buffing wheels and starting a slow smolder. I think I'll start keeping them in a large coffee can with a lid.

Here's the parts that will become the front foot-pegs. My first design didn't pass the test so I had to re-do. Attempt #2 passed with flying colors.The round loops at the top of the peg extensions were formed by beating some 1/8" x 3/4" steel around a 15/16ths socket, then welding them to the square tubing.
My highly scientific test consists of putting all my heft on one side at a time and seeing if it gives when I jump up and down. Not that I'm planning on getting air, but an occasional unplanned get-off is possible and I'd like to think it will hold up.

Here's what the peg parts look like assembled. It looks complicated but the two-axis pivoting is necessary. The whole assembly will swing up when going over something like a log or boulder; and each peg can fold up independently of the other if the bike goes on its side.
The kickstand is from the motorcycle junkyard. It is an aftermarket part, designed to bolt on the swingarm of a bike that didn't have a stand. It wasn't too hard to fab a mount of some 1/4" scraps in a way that still allows assembly / removal with a couple 1/4 - 20 fasteners.

Last edited by Tracker; 05-10-2012 at 03:31 PM.
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  #42  
Old 05-09-2012, 07:59 PM
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Santa came to my house today in a UPS truck. I guess it's time to pry the wheel assemblies apart and give them what they need so I can mount rubber.
I felt a slight tinge of nostalgia when I discovered that Nethercutt sourced the brake assembly from early 60's Ducati singles. I had a few of them many moons ago.
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  #43  
Old 05-12-2012, 09:30 PM
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Default Phew!


This could have gotten exciting.
Getting the axle and bearings out of the rear drum was quite a chore. Once I figured out how it all came apart, I thought it would just be a matter of carefully applying the BFH. My assumption was close but I also needed to torch the aluminum drums pretty good. Once the rear was apart I started to take off the front wheel to do the same.
Before I pulled the wheel I thought, "Wouldn't it be odd if someone put gas in this thing?" Well, good thing I checked before taking the torch to it. It did have gas in it. Not much- maybe two cups or so. But I'm pretty sure taking a torch to a sealed metal container with a little gas in it could be a problem. Even if the stuff did smell like McClosky's Man-O-War spar varnish.

A neighbor of mine has access to a cabinet media blaster and he saved me a lot of work by giving my tank the treatment. He brought it back today so I had to start on some dent filling. I was feeling a little "Old School" so I decided to use lead. Actually, I was flat out of Bondo or I never would have considered such a move.
I did a small one on the top and it came out OK. Even so, there's no doubt in my mind why Bondo was invented.
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  #44  
Old 05-13-2012, 07:56 AM
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Lookin good... lookin good! keep us updated
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  #45  
Old 05-13-2012, 09:08 AM
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This should end up one cool ride, I bet they would be a great tool.fer hunting.
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  #46  
Old 05-13-2012, 09:22 AM
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Originally Posted by farmercrf450x View Post
This should end up one cool ride, I bet they would be a great tool.fer hunting.
That's the plan. It's not that I'm getting older or anything like that. It's just that I'm planning on killing bigger deer that will require mechanized assistance to bring back.

Last edited by Tracker; 05-13-2012 at 09:28 AM.
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  #47  
Old 05-13-2012, 02:37 PM
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A man after my own heart. Using a torch on a fuel tank. I do seem to start some blazes. Floyd layed a snowmaching on it's side in the shop and started to work on the track. I showed up, ask if he was ready for coffee. When we came back the doors all had black smoke signs all around them.

when we finally opened it up, we had a shop that was pretty much charcoal. never really flamed, but the sled was what you would call candle art.
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  #48  
Old 05-13-2012, 05:51 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post
A neighbor of mine has access to a cabinet media blaster and he saved me a lot of work by giving my tank the treatment. He brought it back today so I had to start on some dent filling. I was feeling a little "Old School" so I decided to use lead. Actually, I was flat out of Bondo or I never would have considered such a move.
I did a small one on the top and it came out OK. Even so, there's no doubt in my mind why Bondo was invented.
Sounds to me that when it's complete, you should call (label) it "Lead Sled".
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  #49  
Old 05-13-2012, 06:39 PM
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I love it!!! This has to be one of the coolest builds I have seen in quite some time.

Quote:
But I'm pretty sure taking a torch to a sealed metal container with a little gas in it could be a problem. Even if the stuff did smell like McClosky's Man-O-War spar varnish.
Been there, done that. I welded up some pin holes in my 300 fourtrax tank, and even after airing it out for over a month, I still had a few pops that scared the living crap out of me. I'll never forget that sucking sound before you here the boom.

Keep it up. I am really interested in seeing how this one comes together.

Good work!

Andy
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  #50  
Old 05-13-2012, 10:38 PM
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lots of guys I know have welded tanks up with fuel in them by running exhaust gas from a pickup into them (they continue as they weld),. i have done lots of them empty and rinsed, and some with C02. I sweat when I do it, though I never have even had a pop out of it. I know a few guys that went to the hospital though.
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  #51  
Old 05-14-2012, 09:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tracker View Post

Before I pulled the wheel I thought, "Wouldn't it be odd if someone put gas in this thing?" Well, good thing I checked before taking the torch to it. It did have gas in it. Not much- maybe two cups or so. But I'm pretty sure taking a torch to a sealed metal container with a little gas in it could be a problem. Even if the stuff did smell like McClosky's Man-O-War spar varnish.

My pop always said that a cup of gasoline mixed with the right amount of oxygen was equal to 2 sticks of dynamite.
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  #52  
Old 05-14-2012, 11:44 AM
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Gas + oxygen + pressure (like an inclosed gas tank) = dynamite.

Back when I used to be big into drag racing, it was not uncommon too see somebody heating a nitrous bottle with a torch in an attempt to build more line pressure. At night, you could even see the bottles glow orange a little.

I guess I'm too chicken for all of that.

Andy
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  #53  
Old 05-14-2012, 12:05 PM
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Cant wait to see this when its done!
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  #54  
Old 05-14-2012, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by Mainjet2001 View Post
Sounds to me that when it's complete, you should call (label) it "Lead Sled".

Now that I think about it: Are they even allowed to put lead in lead anymore? I just walked out to the garage and checked my spool of metal working solder. The biggest writing on the side said "Lead Free".
It may be hard to find words that rhyme with tin, antimony, bismuth, and silver.
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  #55  
Old 05-20-2012, 09:54 PM
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Default Sheet metal work today


Stripping the 1963 paint off the original fender was tougher and more painful than I thought it would be. The can of paint remover I bought could only soften it up. A lot of scraping and wire-brushing was needed to get to bare metal. A word to the wise: Always wear gloves when you use paint remover. Not because the stuff will hurt our hands- It won't if you have hands that see a lot of work. The gloves are needed so they can be removed when one must go to the bathroom and touch skin not quite so calloused.


This is about the extent of my sheet metal working tools. I always preach "...the right tool for the job..". But when it comes down to it I revert to my roots, which in moto-speak is "Run what you brung".

This thing didn't have a front fender originally but I want one so I have to make it from scratch. I figured I would do my part for the environment and utilize recycled materials whenever possible.
Either that or I'm incredibly cheap.
If you lost a piece of sheet metal at the Smokey Bear off-ramp from I-5 a month or so ago, it's now a front fender for a Trail-Breaker motorcycle.

I copied the angles and widths from the original rear fender when I made the front; so it seems to match pretty well. When I put the new front fender in its approximate future place I was forced to remember that this thing has a chain and sprocket on the front wheel too.

There will likely have to be a chain clearance mod done once I actually mount it up and run a chain around the sprockets.
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  #56  
Old 05-23-2012, 09:17 PM
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This brings back good memories my first bike was a Rokon TrailBreaker it would go anywhere it seemed like. Nice work
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  #57  
Old 05-28-2012, 09:54 PM
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Quote:
There will likely have to be a chain clearance mod done once I actually mount it up and run a chain around the sprockets.
Yup- the front chain is a tight fit anyway. My fender was right in the way. This may have something to do with why they didn't have a front fender on the early ones. I couldn't see sitting right behind a driven wheel with no fender though.
I framed the openings with 1/8 x 1/2" steel in case a stray twig should find its way to the chain and try to do damage.


I finally got the front hub apart and I was glad to see everything inside was in good shape- and there was plenty meat left on the shoes. At first I was worried that if it needed new brake shoes (for a early-60's Ducati) they would be hard to find.Then I realized that these days with Ebay and all the interest in vintage restos, it's probably easier to find those shoes now than when the bikes were new. I didn't need them anyway.
The axle bolt threads were buggered and the bearings were toast so new ones just got ordered tonight.


Time to start laying down the finish. This tank was pretty hammered and it took a lot of Bondo work to be smooth again. I was afraid to use the torch and compressed air to pop dents out on this one.
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  #58  
Old 05-29-2012, 07:16 AM
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That framing is top notch. Looks factory.

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How is the sprocket attached?
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  #59  
Old 05-29-2012, 09:46 AM
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How is the sprocket attached?
There are no mechanical fasteners. It's a interference fit. I saw a set of them on Ebay once so it must be possible to replace them. I'm guessing you would have to chill down the aluminum and get the steel pretty hot, then press the sprocket on. I shudder to think about the set up and jigs you would have to make to get it on there straight.
A lot of guys with the 15" rims convert to the newer 12" drums or spoke rims so there seems to be replacements out there. I'd buy used ones or go to 12"s before I tried to get new sprockets on the old rims.
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  #60  
Old 05-29-2012, 11:03 AM
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Growing up in Mississippi, I always wanted one of those Rokons to go to the river with. It sucked carrying a tacklebox and rod/reels on a YZ100! That Rokon would have been awesome!
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