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Old 03-26-2011, 10:36 AM
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Default Hand Fatigue

     

I am 34 years old and have worked with my hands all my life. I have been a professional carpenter for over 12 years, wrenched for around seven, and now I still work outside with pliers, shovels, pulling rope, etc. i have strong hands and arms due to the labor intensive work I do. However, when i ride I have to back off and rest my hands after 15-30 min., depending on what I am doing, and let the numbness go away. What gives?

Could it be due to just not being used to riding after so many years, but if that was the case my tolerance should build, but no.

Could it be mechanical such as bar setting, suspension, etc.?

Any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

-Bleed
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Old 03-26-2011, 01:22 PM
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What you may need to do is stretch you hands before you ride, and drink water too.
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Old 03-26-2011, 03:16 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 03 CR125r View Post
What you may need to do is stretch you hands before you ride, and drink water too.
Tried that, just in case it may be a cramping, but there is no pain at all associated with this sensation. Not even a feeling of tingling like when your hand or arm goes to sleep from laying on it. Just numb.
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Old 03-26-2011, 06:36 PM
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Try to not grip the bike so hard with your hands.Your main grip on the bike should be with your knees and legs, (like riding a horse) your hands should not be "white knuckling" the grips. Also try to completely relax your hands when you are in the air.

Last edited by Tuck; 03-26-2011 at 06:50 PM.
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Old 03-26-2011, 09:59 PM
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with me it is about foot positioning and more concerns arm pump. when you ride (like any other athletic edeavor) your feet shouldnt be in a toes even position. one of the best reason for wide footpegs. get one foot in front of the other slightly, your balance will improve and the load on your wrists, hands and forearms goes down to a manageable level, at least in my case.
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BleedMarshall View Post
I am 34 years old and have worked with my hands all my life. I have been a professional carpenter for over 12 years, wrenched for around seven, and now I still work outside with pliers, shovels, pulling rope, etc. i have strong hands and arms due to the labor intensive work I do. However, when i ride I have to back off and rest my hands after 15-30 min., depending on what I am doing, and let the numbness go away. What gives?

Could it be due to just not being used to riding after so many years, but if that was the case my tolerance should build, but no.

Could it be mechanical such as bar setting, suspension, etc.?

Any other suggestions?

Thanks in advance.

-Bleed
Dude .... I know exactly what you mean, what I found was it was all about being able to relax and that comes only with saddle time. as Andy said hold the bike with your knees.... make sure your feet are using the pegs to hold on too... angle them forward.

Thanks
Scott.
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Old 03-26-2011, 11:55 PM
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like dodging said, lock yourself to the bike with your legs, your feet squeezing the frame, your knees squeezing the tank, and your hands lightly gripping the bars so you dont fatigue so fast
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Old 03-27-2011, 01:08 AM
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You might try grips with a different diameter but I bet you are holding on too tight. I ride an old heavy 600 pretty hard in the desert and I have to be very mindful of my body positioning and balance, lest I have to wrestle that beast. I also do a lot of arm strength exercises.
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Old 03-27-2011, 01:17 AM
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If you are on a track or trail, proper form will help. Keep your head over the bars, and get your elbows up. You should be gripping the handlebars with your hands at an angle, sort of like how you would grip a door knob. Grip the bike with your legs and use them to control it. At that point you should be able to relax your hands a bit. There's also no shame in periodically taking a hand off and just squeezing air a few times so that your hands aren't in the same position all the time.
Hope this helps!
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Old 03-27-2011, 02:40 AM
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one thing i left off, if you ride with your toes turned in in kind of makes your knees keep some tension on the tank. for me the foot placement still kind of takes priority, but some people just naturally stand offset.

years back when riders were using skinny pegs (they were literally just pegs), i looked down over a cz ridden by a factory rider at an interam,,,,they were NOT in alignment with eachother. less than a week later mine were not either. now that we have such wide pegs it is easy just to stand like you would for any other get ready position in any other sport (just show me a boxer, baseball player, basketball player, football player etc who does that unless it is just before he gets put on his pants) and you will wonder why everyone doesnt know about that.
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Old 03-27-2011, 02:59 AM
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As said before ... grip with your knees. That helped me 1000%!!
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Old 03-27-2011, 08:29 AM
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I think you all may be on to something. As I don't "white knuckle" the grips, I have realized after reading this thread that my feet do not sit as you have siad. at least until recently. I was riding in general steel toed work boots, my "hooking" boots built for gaffing with a steel plate insole to be exact. However, I recently bought actual riding boots (O'Neal) and have noticed that my feet do sit differently by design of the boot alone.

However, I have yet to notice how my feet turn. I am not sure if they turn in or out, but I believe they turn out and away from the bike. That said, they do turn down now by design of the boot. I know this as I was originally taught to utilize the back brake more than the front. However upon reading and research, i found one should utilize the front brake quite often and feather it. I noticed that the riding boots seem to force my feet down, thus taking my right foot away from the back brake.

I will try to utilize what you have proposed and see what happens. I am sure that I am not doing 100% of what you have said, though, through research, I have been doing what I can by gripping with my legs as opposed to my arms and hands.

Thanks to each of you for the input and info. Much appreciation.

-Bleed
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Old 03-27-2011, 05:54 PM
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Feet position is important and will make a huge difference. As I moved from a 80cc - a 125 - then to a 450 I noticed that I was having a similar issue and that my shifter seemed out of place and I was having to move my whole knee to get in position to shift. I realized that it was not my shifter as much as my foot placement and I was getting arm pump MUCH MUCH worse. I changed my foot position from boots flat on peg with my boot on the arch of the peg to more of the ball of my foot on the front of the peg like this (/_) but not that exagerated where (/) is my boot and (_) is the peg.

It made a huge difference in fatigue and control, I also noticed new bruising on my knees where I was holding on to the tank as they got tougher my ability to ride further harder increased.

Hope that helps

Scott
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Old 03-28-2011, 05:11 PM
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I have yet to put the new positioning to the test, but when I do i will chime in again.

Much appreciation to all the help.
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